Scaling with DT 2.0

A variety of items, at minimum and maximum scale.
A variety of items, at minimum and maximum scale.

Hello again, Dimensionerds!  This segment of the DT 2.0 guides are about scaling.

Sizes in Rift are measured in game units, which correspond to real life meters–which definitely gives the math advantage for those who are used to working with the Metric system!  What scale something has depends on what it is, where it came from in the game world, and how the art deals with going very small to very large.  Some items have more range than others.

All items at minimum scale are .25.  As you can see from the picture above, .25 is very small, particularly with some types of building blocks.

Decorative items and the modular building blocks (walls, stairs, floors, doors, etc) scale up to a size of 2. Corner Posts also scale to a size of 2.

Planks scale from .25 to 6

Cubes and Spheres scale from .25 to 5

Tiles, Rectangles, Poles, Discs and Triangles all scale from .25 to 12.

What good does knowing the minimum and maximum sizes do?  Well, in case you have to do math, or figure up your own offset, those numbers come in handy for figuring distances, for sloping Victorian roofing (just as an example), or when trying to find a center point between two objects where a Dimensional Distance Indicator won’t work.Scale

The scale function is pretty self explanatory, you can either input a size in game unit numbers, (.25, 1.4, 3, etc), or you can scale in relative, and make things larger or smaller in increments–and do it as a group.

Absolute scaling will automatically scale every piece that you have selected to the same size:

I loaded a saved set for a rounded arch with the blocks all at size .5.  Thinking I would be slick, using absolute scale, I tried to make all blocks size 4–which doesn’t allow for the center point of the rotation, so it wound up a jumbled mess–or the interesting start to a geometric pattern, whichever choice you want.  By clicking Reset, the blocks are not reset to their original size from the set, but to the default block size, which is always 1.

Let’s try that in relative, and with a different set:

Whether because of the rotation, the offsets or for some other reason, using the circle example worked far better than using the arch.  Using Relative scaling without having the “as group” box checked left all blocks in the default position, but sized them to .25, without shrinking the offset for each block.

Well, it might make a cool, very large clock...
Well, it might make a cool, very large clock…

Using relative scale doesn’t just work for going smaller, it also worked just as well going larger, too:

Who says you can't teach an old dog new tricks? I honestly had no idea this would work until I wrote this. And all that time I've spent manually shifting blocks to make different sized circles...
Who says you can’t teach an old dog new tricks? I honestly had no idea this would work until I wrote this. And all that time I’ve spent manually shifting blocks to make different sized circles…

As with most things, experimentation is key to finding out the way you can make the scale function work best for you–and maybe learn a thing or two along the way, as I just did.

Happy Building!

 

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