Rotating with DT 2.0

All of this was made using Copy, Paste and Rotations.
All of this was made using Copy, Paste and Rotations.

Hello again, Dimensionerds!  This segment of the DT 2.0 guides covers rotating, which is an area a lot of people tend to find intimidating–when it doesn’t have to be.

Rotate

A function like Custom Pivot may not work too well for the arches shown at the top–or it might, I honestly haven’t tried, and the spin out of Brevane Doorways was using copy and paste with a rotational offset.  Using Relative rotations and saved sets can make things like the image shown a snap–and you only have to make the foundation once.

I think of circles as a pie, and the degrees of rotation are how many slices are in that pie.  Given current item limits, we want to make our pie with as few pieces as possible, so there’s more filling to go around.  The catch is that the slices need to add up to 360.

Of course, we do more than just make circles with the Rotate function, we also make sure that corners are flush and that roofing is straight (the modular roof pieces look like 45 degrees, but they’re actually about 46–and sometimes that slight difference counts!).  The rotate function gives us a precision that can be matched by hand rotations, but it’s much faster.

If you look at the last picture in the slideshow above, you’ll notice that DT translates 90 in the Yaw and 90 in the Roll to be 90 in the Yaw and -90 in the Pitch.  Why is that?  If you’ve used Toolbox, you no doubt recall that rotating in more than one axis often meant rotational bugs when using copy and paste, and this translation eliminates this bug.  If I save this set, I no longer have to re-select and re-save the entire set to correct the issue.

One other thing to keep in mind with working blocks like rectangles, sometimes grain lines run a specific direction and if you want to match them up, you may need to rotate in two axes instead of just one.  The theory works the same as with Toolbox, and I covered that piece here.

Now, say I want to make a conical shape.  For this example, I’ll use a pole, because of the end point.  If using planks, Custom Pivot would probably be a better function to use, because it eliminates a couple of extra steps.

Now, say I’ve changed my mind and I want the cone’s opening to point up.  Once upon a time, that would have meant pulling these poles and reworking the entire spin, or trying to manually turn it upside it and no doubt getting it crooked and having to redo it anyway.  DT 2.0 lets us rotate in a group.

I’ll let that sink in for a moment, because it’s marvelous!

Previous guides for DT 2.0 were written using an Anywhere dimension, and now, I’m standing in Castle Fortune.  If you remember the copy and paste segment, I used a brown wood frame that I had uploaded as a shared Toolbox sets some time ago.  Well, I made some changes to that frame, and now I want to use it in this dimension, and Relative rotate is going to really help me here.

This does not take crazy good math skills to put together--just a bit of time and patience. I probably could have used Custom Pivot to put it together a bit more easily, instead, I used Copy and Paste with rotational offsets.
This does not take crazy good math skills to put together–just a bit of time and patience. I probably could have used Custom Pivot to put it together a bit more easily, instead, I used Copy and Paste with rotational offsets.

Even things like domes and spheres don’t require a math degree, just a bit of patience. I could have used the Custom Pivot function to put the above dome together, but instead, I went the route I’m more familiar with, using copy and paste, set loading, and relative rotate.  Wood cubes are not the final material, but I wanted to get an idea of how many items it would take, and wood cubes (crafted), are cheap to make.

Let’s do it by the numbers, from the first cube to the last:

That may have seemed like a lot of work for just the one rib of the dome, but it actually doesn’t take all that long.

One thing about making domes from things that are square, however, is that there are going to be a lot of extra pieces at the top to ensure that there are no gaps at the bottom.  Once the dome is complete, then I’ll go through and start pulling excess.

But we have to build the rest of the dome, first!

Now, I’ll have to go through and manually pick out the excess, knowing that if I screw up and pull too many, the whole thing is relatively easy to put back together again.

Either with absolute rotating, relative rotating, or rotational offsets when using copy and paste, making square things round really is easy.  Practice makes perfect, and experimentation is key.

Happy Building!

 

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