The Offset Calculator

Offset Calculator

In this segment of the DT 2.0 guides, I’ll be talking about the Offset Calculator tool.  As with most things, there are multiple ways to find out what you need to know, but the Offset Calculator is one the handiest, most underused functions of the entire addon.

It’s simplest application is in finding an offset for copy and paste:

The example above works exactly the same in all axes, but it doesn’t work with all items, and it doesn’t work in all directions.

The Dimensional Distance Indicator, as I’ve said many times before, is one of my favorite tools for finding a center point between two objects.  But it does have it’s limitations, namely with its size.  The smallest diameter of the Indicator is 5m, and the largest is 30m, so if you need to go bigger or smaller, you can either make a plank measuring stick, or you can use the Offset Calculator.

I dropped these two poles to try to get the distance between them. Select both poles, then press DETECT, then press CALCULATE, and now I know that they are 2.4143 game units (meters) apart--so if I want to put something in the middle, now I know where to offset to, by dividing that number in half.
I dropped these two poles to try to get the distance between them. Select both poles, then press DETECT, then press CALCULATE, and now I know that they are 2.4143 game units (meters) apart–so if I want to put something in the middle, now I know where to offset to, by dividing that number in half.

Where the Offset Calculator really shines is in conjunction with Custom Pivot.  If you read the Custom Pivot guide, you may remember that I made a rotunda for my wood cube dome by eyeballing it and guesstimation with a Distance Indicator.  By using the Distance Calculator, I can come up with a much more accurate pivot point.

Did it work?  Let’s find out:

Using the same rotational offset as in the Custom Pivot guide (because the size of the dome didn't change), I used PICK on the metal pole, COPY on the first plank, pulled both planks used to get the distance offset, made sure my settings were correct for the copy and paste, then pressed PASTE. With no manual manipulation, everything turned out according to plan...I love when that happens.
Using the same rotational offset as in the Custom Pivot guide (because the size of the dome didn’t change), I used PICK on the metal pole, COPY on the first plank, pulled both planks used to get the distance offset, made sure my settings were correct for the copy and paste, then pressed PASTE. With no manual manipulation, everything turned out according to plan…I love when that happens.

So now, you get how the offset calculator works in conjunction with items on the large scale, but what about the small end?  The example above was done quite easily in the prior guide using a Distance Indicator, but what about when something is too small for the Indicator?

For standard blocks and angles, the Offset Calculator is hard to beat for convenience and ease of use.  To figure out how to make it work best for you and your builds, experimentation is key.

Happy Building!

 

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