Alfiebet and Tribal Magic

An example of fonts and sizes using the Alfiebet text writer.
An example of fonts and sizes using the Alfiebet text writer.

Using the Alfiebet text writer is a quick and easy way to put text in when your build calls for it.  There are two fonts available:  Lone Ranger and Magneto, and words can go either horizontally or vertically.

The basics of the Alfiebet UI.
The basics of the Alfiebet UI.

To begin, simply type the word you want to spell out in the Word line.  Don’t capitalize, or TT will throw up an error saying only letters are allowed.

More important than the letters themselves are what's in the text box.
More important than the letters themselves are what’s in the text box.

The Lone Ranger font uses exclusively planks and tiles, and words are item intensive.  My name in large font used 64 items.  The function also only writes from left to right, and there’s no controlling where to place the word until it’s spelled out, then moving it where I want it in a group–in this case, I need to turn it around and move it into position on my background pieces.

The Magneto font uses poles, and is a bit less item intensive, but still an item hog if you intend to use a lot of text.

That's better! I used a relative rotation to flip the word 180 degrees, then manually shifted it into position.
That’s better! I used a relative rotation to flip the word 180 degrees, then manually shifted it into position.

One important thing of note, there’s no flicker offset when you load the words, so you may need to spot check and make minute adjustments once you’ve located your text where you want it.

That’s how easy it is!

TRIBAL MAGIC:

Tribal Magic enables you to fly around your dimension using a Round Tribal Table.  The Table adds one item to your overall count (that’s why you’ll sometimes see dimensions that are at 1999 of 2000, etc, to leave room for that one object!).  It’s handy for those occasions when you want to see the top of something, or see a small detail more closely, or if you’ve added a second, third or fourth floor to a structure but haven’t yet put in stairs–or want to take the easy way up that mountain you morphed.

Easier to use than Free Camera and without the range limitations.
Easier to use than Free Camera and without the range limitations.

To use it, simply press Place–after making sure you have a Round Tribal Table in your bags, of course–and you can use the + 1 (or 2, 3, 4) or – 1 (or 2, 3, 4) buttons to go up and down.  When using the +4 or -4, your ascent and descent will be fairly rapid and steep, with the others gradually lessening until 0 has you just flying in a straight line.

Getting a birds' eye view of the surroundings. And who says there's no flying mounts in Rift?!?
Getting a birds’ eye view of the surroundings. And who says there’s no flying mounts in Rift?

When you’re done, simply select Pick Up to clear the table out of your dimension.

One added benefit of Tribal Magic is this:

See that little red x? That's supposed to clear things up when you have items selected that aren't supposed to be--like when you've left edit mode.
See that little red x? That’s supposed to clear things up when you have items selected that aren’t supposed to be–like when you’ve left edit mode.  Sometimes, those pesky blocks get a bit stubborn, though.

Once you start getting into higher item limits, Tinker Tools (and Dimension Tools, which was notorious for this particular issue), will sometimes keep an item selected when you’re no longer working with it–and sometimes not even in edit mode.  I typically run into this when I’m loading large sets.  Normally, clicking the red x will clear up any selected items, but sometimes, it doesn’t.

An easy fix is to drop the table using Tribal Magic, and scoot forward just a little bit.  If the error doesn’t clear up on it’s own, then you can click the red x and the item will deselect without your having to constantly reload the UI.

Happy Building!

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