Moving with Tinker Tools

For basic movement functions and manual offsets, this is the button you want.
For basic movement functions and manual offsets, this is the button you want.

In Tinker Tools, there are two types of movement, Absolute and Relative.  Knowing the difference between the two can save a lot of frustration–and possibly keep you from having to rebuild huge sections of a dimension.

Before we get started, a word about distances.  When talking about movement, the words don’t mean much without knowing what that equates to in a real-world sense (relatively speaking, of course).  When dealing with movement, everything is based off of game units, which correspond to meters, so when you do a Relative movement of 1, you’re moving it the in game equivalent of 1 meter, so .01 is a centimeter, .001 is a millimeter, and so on.

The numbers in the X, Y, Z column of the UI are the location in the dimension of the selection point of this pole--it's absolute location.
The numbers in the X, Y, Z column of the UI are the location in the dimension of the selection point of this pole–it’s absolute location.

When you have an item selected and the Tinker Tools UI open, you’ll see a row of numbers in the X, Y, and Z column (the left hand side).  This is the absolute location in a dimension of that particular item’s selection point–or that group’s selection point, if there are multiple items selected.

By default, the Absolute button of the Move window is selected, but you may not use it very often at all.  Once upon a time, we used to have to use the manual move feature of Toolbox to figure out what a particular offset was, but we don’t need it so often anymore, although moving in Absolute can still come in handy for some circumstances.

The feature we’re more interested in, most of the time, is the Relative movement function.

Relative Move is using Tinker Tools to move an item a set distance in a given direction, and is especially valuable for minute adjustments to smooth out gaps, or to eliminate flicker, or to try to achieve a perfect alignment.

It's hard to tell from a screenshot, but there are overlapping cubes here flickering like crazy. A Relative Move of .001 in all axes will eliminate that flicker and not create a visible mismatch.
It’s hard to tell from a screenshot, but there are overlapping cubes here flickering like crazy. A Relative Move of .001 in all axes will eliminate that flicker and not create a visible mismatch.

If I forget, using the above example, to check the Relative box and I try to do an Absolute Move to .001 in all axes, my block will shoot off into the ether of the dimension, and I’ll receive an error from the Rift client about how my item can’t be placed outside dimension bounds.

One thing to note about Absolute locations, however:  The coordinates for every dimension are different, so a set of coordinates for an Absolute move that may work in one dimension will most likely not work in another of a different key.

210 Items should be doable with the default client...but do you really want to risk it?
210 Items should be doable with the default client…but do you really want to risk it?

With the default Rift client, you really run the risk of a crash if you try to move more than 200 items (I don’t like to push my luck with more than 150, personally).  When you have a crash after trying to move too many items, the chances are highly likely you’ll log back in to a puzzle of items, with no discernible way of putting them back together again–I learned that the hard way…more than once.

With Tinker Tools, however, I can select this entire piece of structure if I decide I want the base to be a bit higher off the ground and move it with no ill effects.  While I’m sure there is a max item limit that TT can move, I haven’t found it–I recently loaded a set with 499 items, moved it and rotated it, without a single crash or even a block going out of place, when I took a constructed frame from one dimension and decided I wanted to use it in a different dimension instead.

This whole thing has been raised 1 game unit relative to its former position.
This whole thing has been raised 1 game unit relative to its former position.

So there you have the Move function broken down into the basics.  Pretty easy, huh?

Happy Building!

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