Saving and Loading Sets in Toolbox

I've got this built in Anywhere, but I want to use it in Castle Fortune.  Toolbox to the rescue!
I’ve got this built in Anywhere, but I want to use it in Castle Fortune. Toolbox to the rescue!

Saving and Loading sets as large as this house frame with Toolbox is something that most people won’t do very often, but you can do it, and that’s the important part.  Anywhere is a great dimension for things like making mock-ups, because it’s flat, and there’s no inconvenient plant life.  There’s also no distractions.  While I’m building something complex (or something that just looks complex, like this little cottage frame), I tend to sometimes get distracted by things that annoy me, like bits of landscaping that aren’t right.  So I’ll stop, and go fix that problem, then I’ll have lost my train of direction with the structure and have to start over on that.  Pre-building frames with materials I’ve got in my bags, not necessarily the final wall material, will allow me the versatility of being able to make what I want as well as giving me a template to work from if I want this cottage in another project.

From here, I can save and import Toolbox sets so I have those sets available for later use.
From here, I can save and import Toolbox sets so I have those sets available for later use.

How large of a set can Toolbox handle?  I don’t recommend going above 175 items on a set.  For myself, I really don’t like to load sets larger than 150 items.  The house above will push the limits of Toolbox, it’s 158 items without being completed on the interior or with fenced walls on the outside around back.  As a guarantee, I’ve also saved it in DT, where I’ve loaded a set of 206 items successfully with only minor rotational errors that were easily fixed, and we’ll talk more about those errors in a little bit, because Toolbox and DT (Dimension Tools) both have them.

The larger the set, the more errors you will have, that’s the bottom line.  If the set is too large, you’ll crash your client and may come back to a jigsaw puzzle.

To save a set, it’s only a couple of easy steps to follow:

1.  Select all the items that went into making the set, whether it’s only a couple or an entire house frame.

2.  Assign the set a name.  Toolbox will not save the set unless it has a name, just like with Importing.

3.  Press Save Set.

There should be a message in your chat window that says that set “insert name here” was successfully saved.  I highly recommend that you log out and back in after saving sets in both Toolbox and DT.  Using the /reloadui command should work, but I like to log all the way out.  Why?  One simple reason.  Disconnects while using Toolbox at higher item limits are common (and sometimes even when not at a higher limit).  If you get disconnected without a logout after saving a set, that set will vanish from Toolbox and Dimension Tools.  Why that is, I don’t know, I just know that it happens.  If I value a morph enough to want to keep it as a saved set, I want to make sure I keep that set, so I logout and back in.

You can stop right there, but especially with sets this large, I go through the item list and re-select everything again, and those Toolbox errors are the reason for this.  I want to test out the set, so when I either share it on Rift Dimension Addicts or load it in the actual dimension where it will be used, it works as intended.  I find it embarrassing now that I didn’t take that time with my earlier shares, so some of the sets are a bit buggy.

Bugged, how?

When we were rotating, I mentioned that Toolbox has a tendency to bug when you rotate in multiple axes, especially when it comes to the Roll.  In the example shown, I’ve got several planks rotated at 90 degrees in the Yaw, and 90 degrees in the Roll.  When those paste or are loaded as a set, the rotation for a plank rotated like that will be read as 90 in the Yaw, and -90 in the Roll, and the plank will be off-center.  Luckily, there is a very easy fix for this error, but it involves loading the set.

As you can see, the Toolbox errors flipped the Roll rotations on several of my building blocks.  Easy fix?  While everything is selected, save it again, and use the bug to your advantage.
As you can see, the Toolbox errors flipped the Roll rotations on several of my building blocks. Easy fix? While everything is selected, save it again, and use the bug to your advantage.

As expected, my building blocks that were rotated at 90 degrees in both Yaw and Roll came out as -90 in the Roll when I loaded the set, which changed the centerpoints of those blocks.  I could go through and manually shift everything, but I already have everything selected, and the fix is much easier.  While I have it all selected, I’m simply going to save the set again, and make Toolbox bug out in my favor.

Whew, that's better!
Whew, that’s better!

When I reloaded it the second time, I made sure to check the Load at Original Location box, which I did not do the first time, so I had to manually shift it in position.  This box really only does me a lot of good if I’m using a version of the same dimension:  that is, if I use another Anywhere to load this house, it will load in the same spot.  Since every dimension has different coordinates, chances are very good it’s not going to work in another dimension if I select that checkbox.  However, if I’m doing dimension recovery, I want to check that box, to make sure all the saved sets restore in the correct position.

Another way you can back up your sets from Toolbox is also to make a copy on your computer.  I like to use Notepad, and all you have to do is follow the steps for exporting a set.  Instead of uploading to DA, however, you just paste it in Notepad and you’re set.  Then you can crash and disconnect, and have no worries that your set might be gone forever with hours of work down the drain.

Other ways that set saving is useful:

Complicated morphs that you may use again but only want to make one time.

Set sharing (I can never get enough of encouraging this).

Making your own templates for common household items, structural components, and entire structures.

Modifying sets with new materials is done more easily and quickly than building the same set with those new materials from scratch. (Simply copy and paste the existing materials with the new).

You can save your entire dimension in groups of 100 pieces (or so, I like 100 because it’s a nice round number), in case you start tinkering and accidentally destroy it.

Happy Building!

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