Spinning

These Six-Prong Idols are spun out in -15 degrees in the Roll.  Based on the center point and very simple math, 24 idols were required to make a full circle.  To eliminate flicker, offset in all axes by .001.
These Six-Prong Idols are spun out in -15 degrees in the Roll. Based on the center point and very simple math, 24 idols were required to make a full circle. To eliminate flicker, offset in all axes by .001.

Spinning is a short way of saying I’m going to use the Copy and Paste function of Toolbox and offset through rotations to make square things round.  You can spin, literally, anything.

There are two basic types of circles you can make:  open and closed.  We covered open circles a little bit in the segment about rotating in Toolbox, because that’s basically using rotations to make a circular outline, as with building blocks.  The circle from Six Prong Idols pictured above is a closed circle, as the middle is filled in.

This is just an example of what one item can be transformed into, when experimenting with degrees of rotation.
This is just an example of what one item can be transformed into, when experimenting with degrees of rotation.

It doesn’t just have to be flat items that are spun, textured items are also great for spinning.  The only downside, however, is that spinning is item intensive.  Depending on your degrees of rotation, a single spin could require anywhere from 12 to 36 items.  Also, some items have weird center points, so you may think you need 12, but in the end you need 18 or 24 or 30 to get the same circle from disparate items.

You may be saying:  “All this is well and good, but how do I actually go about spinning?”

It’s actually easier than it may sound!

Here’s the step by step breakdown:

1.  Drop a chair and scale it to size.  Press COPY.

2.  For this example, I used 24 chairs on a 15 degree rotation (15 x 24 = 360).  Offset by .001 in X, Y and Z to eliminate flicker, then pick either Yaw, Pitch or Roll to enter your rotational offset.

3.  Drop 23 more chairs.  If using DT, this is unnecessary, there are simply a couple more input fields that need data to be entered.  Select all 24 items.

4.  Check the box that says:  Offset each item.  This will offset each piece in increments, so you don’t have 24 chairs in a pile on a 15 degree cant.

5.  Press PASTE.

Every spin, no matter what, will go pretty much in that same manner.  Experimentation comes in with figuring out how tight of a circle you want to make to achieve the effect you’re trying to pull off, and sometimes, different rotations give entirely different results.  If you’re not sure which way to rotate, check the circles of the default editor, and correspond the colors of the editing tool to Yaw, Pitch or Roll.  To get the hang of it, I highly recommend playing with inexpensive items like the maple chairs, six prong idols and plain old wooden planks, and seeing what works best for you.

Happy Building!

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